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Practically Speaking

Kyle and her husband moved to Brookfield in 1986. She became active in local politics and started blogging in 2004. Her focus is primarily on local issues but often includes state and national topics, too. Kyle looks at things from the taxpayers' perspective in a creative, yet down to earth way, addressing them from a practical point of view.

He was for Public Financing before he ditched it

Elections, Obama 2008, Politics

 http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122367340072924059.html?mod=djemEditorialPage Rich vs. Poor, Obama crushes McCain with his wallet.

No doubt about it, Barack Obama is spending a lot more on ads than John McCain. You would think Obama would be higher up in the polls. Maybe that should be the story. 

As the election heads into its home stretch, Barack Obama is deploying the financial muscle he gained from opting out of the general election public financing system that John McCain is locked into.

In key swing states, Mr. Obama is flooding the airwaves with commercials. Last week alone, he spent $17.4 million on ads in those states versus only $10.9 million for the combined efforts of Mr. McCain and the Republican Party. In Wisconsin, local political observers report they see fewer McCain ads than ever while ads urging people to "vote early for Obama" are ubiquitous.

In Florida, a state that used to favor Mr. McCain in polls, Team Obama spent $2.2 million in ads last week, while Mr. McCain made do with an ad buy of less than $700,000. In Ohio, Mr. Obama spent $2.2 million to Mr. McCain's $1.7 million.

Ad money isn't everything in politics, but this is the first presidential election in recent memory where Democrats have a significant financial edge over Republicans. Other than the debates, ads are the biggest single source of information that many voters receive about the candidates. The Obama edge could prove crucial in several states -- which is precisely why he ditched the public financing system he once so fervently supported.

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