NOW:53045:USA01489
http://widgets.journalinteractive.com/cache/JIResponseCacher.ashx?duration=5&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdata.wp.myweather.net%2FeWxII%2F%3Fdata%3D*USA01489
34°
H 54° L 28°
Clear | 3MPH

Practically Speaking

Kyle and her husband moved to Brookfield in 1986. She became active in local politics and started blogging in 2004. Her focus is primarily on local issues but often includes state and national topics, too. Kyle looks at things from the taxpayers' perspective in a creative, yet down to earth way, addressing them from a practical point of view.

Reflecting on the 60s and Martin Luther King Jr.

History, Truth

Today is one of those days that reminds me of how far we have come as a nation. April 4, 1968 of course was the day Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down. His I Have a Dream speech is still very powerful and reflects a very biblical view of what the brotherhood of mankind should be.

Some people are comparing Obama and King, but for me there is no comparison. Their approach and message is so very different.

Today, I much prefer the message of Martin Luther King Jr's niece, Dr Alveda King. She much more embodies the work of her uncle, in that she promotes judging someone on the content of their character, not the color of their skin.

In looking back to my school days, I remember my first trip to Florida in the early 60s. It was my first time in the south and I think I was in the 6th grade. When we stopped at a gas station in Georgia, I was puzzled over the 2 sets of restrooms. Mom, what does White Ladies Only mean? It seemed so odd. She explained why they had the 2 sets of bathrooms, but it still did not make much sense.

Fast forward in time to the summer of 1967. We were camping up in Rhinelander when the riots broke out in Milwaukee. I think there was a photo in the local paper up there of the National Guard and rioters in the street back home. That was rather eerie. Another picture I remember was of barricades across Lake Drive on the Shorewood (my suburb) and Milwaukee border.

My Jr. year was a bloody one. Martin Luther King Jr and Bobby Kennedy shot down. One wondered if there ever would be a brotherhood of man.

But things have improved. For whatever you may think of the Bush administration, one cannot ignore the fact that his cabinet has judged people on the content of their character and not the color of their skin. President Bush Senior appointed Justice Clarence Thomas to the highest court in our land.

When my son and I were studying American History and Civil Rights, pictures of segregated drinking fountains and lunch counters seemed just as ridiculous to him as that separate bathroom did to me as a child. 

Today, more people are involved in integrated relationships, marriages, and adoptions than ever before. One has to wonder how in time anyone will even know if someone is "white" or "black" because there will be no such thing.  We will just be mankind. "There is really only one race--the human race. The Bible teaches us that God has 'made of one blood all the nations of men.' Acts 17:26", and isn't that what Martin Luther King Jr. preached? 

We still have a long way to go but sometimes it is difficult to see any progress unless you look back and see how far we have come. The Dream Didn't Die with Martin Luther King

 

Links:

counter hit xanga

Brookfield7, Fairly Conservative, Betterbrookfield
Vicki Mckenna

 

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools